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Karla’s Flax, Almond Meal and Spelt Pancakes

5 Apr

1.5 cup raw      Bobs Red Mill – Spelt Flour Whole Grain Stone Ground
 4.5 tsp              Argo – Baking Powder Aluminum Free
1.5  tsp              Table Salt
2 Tblspn           Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2.5 cups           Simple Truth Organic – Plain Soy Milk
2 large               Eggs
2 Tblspn           Maple Syrup
2  Tblspn          Organic – Flax Seed Whole
1 cup                 Raw Almonds
Grind flaxseeds
Grind almonds to make almond meal (course grind, but not chunky. Be careful to grind it too much, it may turn into almond butter)
Mix together flour, baking powder, salt, ground flaxseeds, ground almonds.
In another bowl, mix the olive oil, soy milk, eggs and syrup together.
Pour liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients.
Cook like regular pancakes.
Makes 8 6-7 inch pancakes
VARIATIONS:
Almond milk (Makes the pancakes taste/feel like waffles….kids LOVED that.)
Use your favorite flour.
Grind up some oats, until they are flourlike, but with some good sized oat bits still in them and use that instead of flour. Or replace the almond meal with the ground oats.

Homemade Ranch

5 Apr

Ok. So, THIS is my very own recipe. I didn’t know how to make it before I did. 😉 LOL

There are SEVERAL variations that I’ve used, to this recipe, depending on what was in my fridge, and what I was or wasn’t eating. Here is the BASIC way I make it, the variations will follow.

 

1 cup whole milk plain yogurt
1/2 cup diced/chopped fresh cilantro, including stems
2 Tablespoons dill weed
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
Sea Salt, to taste

Mix together, refrigerate to allow flavors to mingle.

 

Variations:

Greek Yogurt (more protein, less fat)
Mayo (richer flavor)
Sour Cream (thicker)
(If you do mayo and sour cream, it’s an awesome dip, plus, you can thin it out with milk)

 

Spinach Salad Ninja Style, SIMPLIFIED, without all that fluff stuff

4 Apr

1 (or more) cups of organic baby spinach
1 (or 1/2, depending on preference) kiwi fruit, peeled and diced.
1/4 cup broccoli
small amount of tiny diced red onion

     1 1/2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
     1 (or 1/2) clove of raw garlic, mince/pressed
     1 wedge of lemon for the juice 

Mix together evoo, garlic, lemon juice for a ‘dressing’. Toss into salad.

Sea salt, to taste, if desired

Ok, go ahead, throw in a  sprinkle of raw pumpkin seeds…it’ll only get BETTER!

(if you don’t like ‘chewing’ for days on spinach, use kitchen shears and snip the spinach into smaller bites…that’s what I do)

Other ways I make it:

Steamed/boiled chicken breast (4 oz.)

diced strawberries
(I be sure to use organic, it’s on the ‘dirty dozen‘ list, and I prefer less ‘death’ on my food, thank you very much.) (LOL…Wow, that almost sounded like the lady that said I was a murderer for eating chicken…or beef…sorry guys…my bad. 😉 LOL Don’t worry, there is a CLEAN 15 list to go with it! See, good news!)

raw sunflower seeds

cauliflower

diced apple

avocado…oh, yes, I LOVE avocado in my salad…especially with chicken

I do not use cheese, traditional dressing, crackers, bacon, croutons…etc.

One of my personal favorites: Spinach Salad Ninja

4 Apr

A kickbutt salad. It’s delish. It’s sneaky amazing healthy like a ninja…yeah, you KNOW it’s ‘healthy’, like you KNOW a ninja when you see one, but you have NO CLUE how INSANELY AMAZING it really is, until you start researching and reading! LOVE IT!

And, it’s really rather easy…all the way around. How can it be THIS easy to HELP your body in NUMEROUS WAYS!?!? All I can say is, WOW!

1 (or more) cups of organic baby spinach (read below) (or click here for the WHOLE story on Spinach)

(if you don’t like ‘chewing’ for days on spinach, use kitchen shears and snip the spinach into smaller bites…that’s what I do)

1 (or 1/2, depending on preference) kiwi fruit, peeled and diced. (read below) (or click here for the WHOLE story on Kiwifruit)

1/4 cup broccoli (read below) (or click here for the WHOLE story on Broccoli)

small amount of tiny diced red onion (read below) (or click here for the WHOLE story on Onions)

1 1/2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil (read below) (or click here for the WHOLE story on EVOO)

1 (or 1/2) clove of raw garlic, mince/pressed (read below) (or click here for the WHOLE story on Garlic)

1 wedge of lemon for the juice (or more, to taste)

Mix together evoo, garlic, lemon juice for a ‘dressing’. Toss into salad.

Sea salt, to taste, if desired

Ok, go ahead, throw in a  sprinkle of raw pumpkin seeds…it’ll only get BETTER!

3-4 oz. salmon, either on your bed of salad or flaked into your salad (see below) (or click here for the WHOLE story on Salmon)

EVERY ingredeant in that salad is on the Worlds Healthiest Foods List

Drink a cup of Decaf. Green Tea, with a squeeze of fresh lemon, or half a grapefruit, and you have LOVED and SUPPORTED your BODY TREMENDOUSLY!

(I’m not even copying and pasting ANY info down below on Green Tea, because there IS SO MUCH that Green Tea does, you just HAVE to read it!)

Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cancer Benefits from Spinach Phytonutrients

Even though virtually all vegetables contain a wide variety of phytonutrients—including flavonoids and carotenoids—spinach can claim a special place among vegetables in terms of its phytonutrient content. Researchers have identified more than a dozen different flavonoid compounds in spinach that function as anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agents. (Some of these substances fall into a technical category of flavonoids known asmethylenedioxyflavonol glucuronides.) The anticancer properties of these spinach flavonoids have been sufficiently impressive to prompt researchers to create specialized spinach extracts that could be used in controlled laboratory studies. These spinach extracts have been shown to slow down cell division in human stomach cancer cells (gastric adenocarcinomas), and in studies on laboratory animals, to reduce skin cancers (skin papillomas). A study on adult women living in New England in the late 1980s also showed intake of spinach to be inversely related to incidence of breast cancer.

Excessive inflammation, of course, typically emerges as a risk factor for increased cancer risk. (That’s why many anti-inflammatory nutrients can also be shown to have anti-cancer properties.) But even when unrelated to cancer, excessive inflammation has been shown to be less likely following consumption of spinach. Particularly in the digestive tract, reduced inflammation has been associated not only with the flavonoids found in spinach, but also with its carotenoids. Neoxanthin and violaxanthin are two anti-inflammatory epoxyxanthophylls that are found in plentiful amounts in the leaves of spinach. While these unique carotenoids may not be as readily absorbed as carotenoids like beta-carotene or lutein, they still play an important role in regulation of inflammation and are present in unusual amounts in spinach.

Kiwi’s Phytonutrients Protect DNA 

In the world of phytonutrient research, kiwifruit has fascinated researchers for its ability to protect DNA in the nucleus of human cells from oxygen-related damage. Researchers are not yet certain which compounds in kiwi give it this protective antioxidant capacity, but they are sure that this healing property is not limited to those nutrients most commonly associated with kiwifruit, including its vitamin C or beta-carotene content. Since kiwi contains a variety of flavonoids and carotenoids that have demonstrated antioxidant activity, these phytonutrients in kiwi may be responsible for this DNA protection.

The protective properties of kiwi have been demonstrated in a study with 6- and 7-year-old children in northern and central Italy. The more kiwi or citrus fruit these children consumed, the less likely they were to have respiratory-related health problems including wheezing, shortness of breath, or night coughing. These same antioxidant protective properties may have been involved in providing protection for these children.

Broccoli Can Enhance Detoxification 

Most toxins that pose a risk to our cells must be detoxified in our body by a 2-step process. What’s remarkable about broccoli is its ability to alter activity in both of these two detox steps. Isothiocyanates (ITCs) made from the glucosinolates in broccoli are well-documented modifiers of the first step in detoxification (called Phase I). In fact, some ITCs like sulforaphane can actually help shut down the genetic machinery that produces certain Phase I enzymes. ITCs are equally capable of altering the activity of enzymes involved in the second step of detoxification (called Phase II). From research in the field of genetics, we know that ITCs can help bridge gaps in Phase II activity when it is insufficient. Taken in combination, the impact of ITCs on Phase I and II detox events is unique—and equally unique is the presence of glucosinolate compounds in broccoli that can be used to make ITCs. Glucosinolates like glucoraphanin, gluconasturtiian, and glucobrassicin are simply not found in other foods in the same combination and concentration that is offered by broccoli. By helping to promote as well as regulate detox activity in our cells, the ITCs made from broccoli can help prevent insufficient detoxification of dangerous substances that threaten our cells.

 What’s New and Beneficial About Onions

  • The flavonoids in onion tend to be more concentrated in the outer layers of the flesh. To maximize your health benefits, peel off as little of the fleshy, edible portion as possible when removing the onion’s outermost paper layer. Even a small amount of “overpeeling” can result in unwanted loss of flavonoids. For example, a red onion can lose about 20% of its quercetin and almost 75% of its anthocyanins if it is “overpeeled.”
  • The total polyphenol content of onions is much higher than many people expect. (Polyphenols are one of the largest categories of phytonutrients in food. This category includes all flavonoids as well as tannins.) The total polyphenol content of onion is not only higher than its fellow allium vegetables, garlic and leeks, but also higher than tomatoes, carrots, and red bell pepper. In the French diet, only six vegetables (artichoke heart, parsley, Brussels sprouts, shallot, broccoli, and celery) have a higher polyphenol content than onion. Since the French diet has been of special interest to researchers in terms of disease prevention, onion’s strong polyphenol contribution will very likely lead to follow-up studies that pay closer attention to this unique allium vegetable.
  • Within the polyphenol category, onions are also surprisingly high in flavonoids. For example, on an ounce-for-ounce basis, onions rank in the top 10 of commonly eaten vegetables in their quercetin content. The flavonoid content of onions can vary widely, depending on the exact variety and growing conditions. Although the average onion is likely to contain less than 100 milligrams of quercetin per 3-1/2 ounces, some onions do provide this amount. And while 100 milligrams may not sound like a lot, in the United States, moderate vegetable eaters average only twice this amount for all flavonoids (not just quercetin) fromall vegetables per day.
  • When onions are simmered to make soup, their quercetin does not get degraded. It simply gets transferred into the water part of the soup. By using a low-heat method for preparing onion soup, you can preserve the health benefits of onion that are associated with this key flavonoid.
  • When we get quercetin by eating an onion-rather than consuming the quercetin in purified, supplement form-we may end up getting better protection from oxidative stress. That’s exactly what happened in an animal study where some animals had yellow onion added to their diet in a way that would provide the same amount of quercetin provided to other animals in the form of purified quercetin extracts. The best protection came from the onion version of this flavonoid, rather than the supplement form.
  • Several servings of onion each week are sufficient to statistically lower your risk of some types of cancer. For colorectal, laryngeal, and ovarian cancer, between 1-7 servings of onion has been shown to provide risk reduction. But for decreased risk of oral and esophageal cancer, you’ll need to consume one onion serving per day (approximately 1/2 cup).

WHFoods Recommendations

With their unique combination of flavonoids and sulfur-containing nutrients, the allium vegetables—such as onions—belong in your diet on a regular basis. There’s research evidence for including at least one serving of an allium vegetable—such as onions—in your meal plan every day.

When onion is your allium vegetable of choice, try to consume at least one-half of a medium onion on that day, and use this guideline to adjust your recipes accordingly. For example, if you are following a recipe that yields 4 servings, include at least 2 medium onions in the recipe so that each of your 4 servings will contain at least one half medium onion.

To bring out the sweet flavor of onions we recommend using our Healthy Saute method of cooking onions for just 7 minutes. Cut onions into slices of equal 1/4-inch thickness to help them cook more evenly. The thinner you slice the onions the more quickly they will cook. Let them sit for at least 5 minutes to enhance their health-promoting properties. For more details see the Healthiest Way of Cooking Onions in the How to Enjoy section below.

 Anti-Inflammatory Benefits of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

It’s unusual to think about a culinary oil as an anti-inflammatory food. Plant oils are nearly 100% fat, and in a general dietary sense, they are typically classified as “added fats.” Intake of too much added dietary fat can be a problem for many reasons—including reasons involving unwanted inflammation. So it’s pretty remarkable to find a culinary oil that’s repeatedly been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and provide health benefits in the area of unwanted inflammation. Yet that’s exactly the research track record that describes extra virgin olive oil.

The anti-inflammatory strength of olive oil rests on its polyphenols. These anti-inflammatory compounds include at least nine different categories of polyphenols and more than two dozen well-researched anti-inflammatory nutrients. Research has documented a wide variety of anti-inflammatory mechanisms used by olive oil polyphenols to lower our risk of inflammatory problems. These mechanisms include decreased production of messaging molecules that would otherwise increase inflammation (including TNF-alpha, interleukin 1-beta, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4); inhibition of pro-inflammatory enzymes like cyclo-oxygenase 1 and cyclo-oxygenase 2; and decreased synthesis of the enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase.

In heart patients, olive oil and its polyphenols have also been determined to lower blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a widely used blood measurement for assessing the likelihood of unwanted inflammation. They have also been found to reduce activity in a metabolic pathway called the arachidonic acid pathway, which is central for mobilizing inflammatory processes.

These anti-inflammatory benefits of extra virgin olive oil do not depend on large levels of intake. As little as 1-2 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil per day have been shown to be associated with significant anti-inflammatory benefits.

 Antibacterial and Antiviral Benefits of Garlic

From a medical history standpoint, the antibacterial and antiviral properties of garlic are perhaps its most legendary feature. This allium vegetable and its constituents have been studied not only for their benefits in controlling infection by bacteria and viruses, but also infection from other microbes including yeasts/fungi and worms. (One particular disulfide in garlic, called ajoene, has been successfully used to help prevent infections with the yeast Candida albicans.) Very recent research has shown the ability of crushed fresh garlic to help prevent infection by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn patients. Also of special interest has been the ability of garlic to help in the treatment of bacterial infections that are difficult to treat due to the presence of bacteria that have become resistant to prescription antibiotics. However, most of the research on garlic as an antibiotic has involved fresh garlic extracts or powdered garlic products rather than fresh garlic in whole food form.

Overgrowth of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori in the stomach—a key risk factor for stomach ulcer—has been another key area of interest for researchers wanting to explore garlic’s antibacterial benefits. Results in this area, however, have been mixed and inconclusive. While garlic may not be able to alter the course of infection itself, there may still be health benefits from garlic in helping to regulate the body’s response to that infection.

Garlic and Iron Metabolism

Recent research has shown that garlic may be able to improve our metabolism of iron. When iron is stored up in our cells, one of the key passageways for it to be moved out of the cell and returned into circulation involves a protein called ferroportin. Ferroportin is protein that runs across the cell membrane, and it provides a bridge for iron to cross over and leave the cell. Garlic may be able to increase our body’s production of ferroportin, and in this way, help keep iron in circulation as it is needed.

 Tips for Preparing Garlic

The first step to using garlic is to separate the individual cloves. An easy way to do this is to place the bulb on a cutting board or hard surface and gently, but firmly, apply pressure with the palm of your hand at an angle. This will cause the layers of skin that hold the bulb together to separate.

Peel garlic with a knife or alternatively, separate the skin from the individual cloves by placing a clove with the smooth side down on a cutting board and gently tapping it with the flat side of a wide knife. You can then remove the skin either with your fingers or with a small knife. If there is a green sprout in the clove’s center, gently remove it since it is difficult to digest.

Chopping or crushing stimulates the enzymatic process that converts the phytonutrient alliin into allicin, a compound to which many of garlic’s health benefits are attributed. In order to allow for maximal allicin production, wait at least 5 minutes before eating or cooking the garlic. Also observe this 5-minute “time out” period before adding any high acidic ingredient to the garlic (for example, lemon juice). Ingredients with a pH below 3.5 can also deactivate the enzymatic process.

Since crushing and chopping are the food preparation steps that activate garlic’s enzymes, these steps can help you obtain many of garlic’s special benefits. For example, research has shown that microwaving or boiling garlic in uncrushed, whole clove form will deactivate its enzymes, preventing these enzymes from working. For this reason, we recommend that you chop or crush the garlic cloves prior to heating. According to research on garlic preparation methods, it only takes 60 seconds of microwaving whole cloves to lessen some of garlic’s health benefits. By contrast, many of garlic’s health benefits (including its anti-cancer properties) are preserved if the whole cloves are crushed and allowed to sit for 10 minutes prior to cooking.

 The Healthiest Way of Cooking Garlic

We recommend using raw garlic in many of our recipes. If it is a cooked dish you are preparing and you cannot tolerate raw garlic, add chopped garlic towards the end of the cooking time to retain maximum flavor and nutrition. Too much heat for too long will reduce the activity of the health-promoting sulfur compounds that have formed by letting it sit for 5-10 minutes; it will also make garlic bitter. Therefore expose garlic to heat for as little time as possible (5-15 minutes).

If you would like to combine garlic with oil, we recommend that you avoid high-temperature heating of this oil-garlic mixture. Keeping the heat at 250F/121C or lower will help preserve the health benefits of both the garlic and the oil. This same principle applies to the oven roasting of garlic bulbs themselves. We do not recommend the 350F/177C temperature range that you will find in many recipes and on many websites. Once again, a lower temperature is needed to help preserve health-protective compounds in garlic.

 What’s New and Beneficial about Salmon

  • With so much focus on the amazing omega-3 benefits of salmon, other unique health benefits from salmon may have been inadvertently overlooked. One fascinating new area of health benefits involves the protein and amino acid content of salmon. Several recent studies have found that salmon contains small bioactive protein molecules (called bioactive peptides) that may provide special support for joint cartilage, insulin effectiveness, and control of inflammation in the digestive tract. One particular bioactive peptide called calcitonin (sCT) has been of special interest in these studies. The reason is because a human form of calcitonin is made by the thyroid gland, and we know that it is a key hormone for helping regulate and stabilize the balance of collagen and minerals in the bone and surrounding tissue. As researchers learn more and more about salmon peptides—including sCT—we expect to see more and more potential health benefits discovered related to inflammation, including inflammation of the joints.

 Phytonutrients with Antioxidant and Antibiotic Effects from Lemons/Limes

 Like many of the fruits and vegetables featured on our website, lemons and limes contain unique flavonoid compounds that have antioxidant and anti-cancer properties. Of special interest in limes have been flavonoids called flavonol glycosides, including many kaempferol-related molecules. While these flavonoids have been shown to stop cell division in many cancer cell lines, they are perhaps most interesting for their antibiotic effects. In several villages in West Africa where cholera epidemics had occurred, the inclusion of lime juice during the main meal of the day was determined to have been protective against the contraction of cholera. (Cholera is a disease triggered by activity of the bacteria called Vibrio cholera). Researchers quickly began to experiment with the addition of lime juice to the sauce eaten with rice, and in this role, lime juice was also found to have a strong protective effect against cholera.

Several other fascinating research studies on the healing properties of lemons and limes have shown that cell cycles—including the decision a cell makes about whether to divide (called mitosis) or die (apoptosis—are altered by lime juice, as are the activities of special immune cells called monocytes.

In addition to their unique phytonutrient properties, lemons and limes are an excellent source of vitamin C, one of the most important antioxidants in nature. Vitamin C is one of the main antioxidants found in food and the primary water-soluble antioxidant in the body. Vitamin C travels through the body neutralizing any free radicals with which it comes into contact in the aqueous environments in the body both inside and outside cells. Free radicals can interact with the healthy cells of the body, damaging them and their membranes, and also cause a lot of inflammation, or painful swelling, in the body. This is one of the reasons that vitamin C has been shown to be helpful for reducing some of the symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Since free radicals can damage blood vessels and can change cholesterol to make it more likely to build up in artery walls, vitamin C can be helpful for preventing the development and progression of atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease.

Vitamin C is also vital to the function of a strong immune system. The immune system’s main goal is to protect you from illness, so a little extra vitamin C may be useful in conditions like colds, flus, and recurrent ear infections.

Owing to the multitude of vitamin C’s health benefits, it is not surprising that research has shown that consumption of vegetables and fruits high in this nutrient is associated with a reduced risk of death from all causes including heart disease, stroke and cancer.

 Limonins Support Optimal Health

In animal studies and laboratory tests with human cells, compounds in citrus fruits, including lemons and limes, called limonoids have been shown to help fight cancers of the mouth, skin, lung, breast, stomach and colon. Now, scientists from the US Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have shown that our bodies can readily absorb and utilize a very long-acting limonoid called limonin that is present is citrus fruits in about the same amount as vitamin C.

In citrus fruits, limonin is present in the form of limonin glucoside, in which limonin is attached to a sugar (glucose) molecule. Our bodies easily digest this compound, cleaving off the sugar and releasing limonin.

In the ARS study, 16 volunteers were given a dose of limonin glucoside in amounts ranging from those that would be found in from 1 to 7 glasses of orange juice. Blood tests showed that limonin was present in the plasma of all except one of the subjects, with concentrations highest within 6 hours after consumption. Traces of limonin were still present in 5 of the volunteers 24 hours after consumption!

Limonin’s bioavailability and persistence may help explain why citrus limonoids are potent anti-carcinogens that may prevent cancerous cells from proliferating. Other natural anti-carcinogens are available for much less time; for example, the phenols in green tea and chocolate remain active in the body for just 4 to 6 hours.

The ARS team are now investigating the potential cholesterol-lowering effects of limonin. Lab tests indicate that human liver cells produce less apo B when exposed to limonin. Apo B is a structural protein that is part of the LDL cholesterol molecule and is needed for LDL production, transport and binding, so higher levels of apo B translate to higher levels of LDL cholesterol.

Protection against Rheumatoid Arthritis

While one study suggests that high doses of supplemental vitamin C makes osteoarthritis, a type of degenerative arthritis that occurs with aging, worse in laboratory animals, another indicates that vitamin C-rich foods, such as lemons and limes, provide humans with protection against inflammatory polyarthritis, a form of rheumatoid arthritis involving two or more joints.

The findings, presented in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseaseswere drawn from a study of more than 20,000 subjects who kept diet diaries and were arthritis-free when the study began, and focused on subjects who developed inflammatory polyarthritis and similar subjects who remained arthritis-free during the follow-up period. Subjects who consumed the lowest amounts of vitamin C-rich foods were more than three times more likely to develop arthritis than those who consumed the highest amounts.

Grapefruit’s Naringenin Repairs DNA

Naringenin, a flavonoid concentrated in grapefruit, helps repair damaged DNA in human prostate cancer cells (cell line LNCaP), reports a lab study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry.

The risk of prostate cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the U.S, increases with age since the older we become, the more times our cells have divided and the greater the chance for DNA mutations to occur. DNA repair is one of the body’s primary defense mechanisms against the development of cancer since it removes potentially cancer-causing mutations in cells.

Naringenin helps restore health to damaged DNA by inducing two enzymes that repair DNA during the replication stage. These enzymes, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), and DNA polymerase beta (DNA poly beta), are both involved in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway.

The scientists in this study exposed cell cultures to 80 micromoles per liter, an amount we cannot achieve by consuming grapefruit since research indicates that only between 2 and 15% flavonoids in the food we consume are absorbed in the GI tract, and plasma concentrations after eating flavonoid-rich foods range from 0.5 to 1 micromole per liter.

Fortunately, however, the researchers also demonstrated that the concentration of naringenin inside the cells that was needed for its beneficial effects was only 5% of the amount in the medium, and this amount is physiologically achievable in our tissues.

Unlike many other cancers, prostate cancer is slow growing initially and often remains undetectable for a long time. Enjoying grapefruit regularly may be one way to prevent its progression by promoting the repair of damaged DNA in prostate cells, thus preventing them from becoming cancerous.

I’ve REGROUPED and PUSHED on!

24 Mar

HELLO!

I have returned for another round of sharing and putting stuff out there, so to speak.

It’s been A LONG TIME since I’ve been on here! I wonder if anyone noticed? LOL

I’m gonna have to go through my old posts and catch up on what I was last sharing about.

HOWEVER, what I’m going to share NOW is super exciting!

I’ve continued to read and research and found out a lot. I’m piecing together an effective plan for me, and I’ll share why and how I’ve come up with it. It’s a LOT of hours and days and weeks worth of reading and research. I hope you find it interesting.

Hormones and your body.

Leptin Resistance

Eating for Your Blood Type (we’ve talked about that, I’m pretty sure.)

Anti-Inflammatory Foods

Inflammation

Sleep Apnea

Stress

Those are all VERY important topics that are 100% connected to each other. I say often, that it’;s all very circular. I may recoin that phrase after I lay it all out…but really, it’s all connected…in amazing ways!

What I share WILL NOT be for EVERYONE. No judging on my part, that’s for sure….and on that same note, please, if you’re offended by, or against anything I share here, please be kind when stating so. My purpose here is NOT to hand ANYONE the HOLY GRAIL of weight loss, or fix everyone’s (anyone’s) problems. My only intent is to spread some information to stimulate others to learn more about their bodies and the world they live in.

I do not ‘worry’ about anything I personally share here, because the long and short of MY perspective on food is EAT good food. No doctor, or dietitian can say that I am supporting a dangerous diet fad, because I am not. I am simply sharing and exploring the science of food and it’s effects on my body, and hoping it inspires others.

On one hand, I use materials from ‘diets’ or ‘lifestyles’ that can be/become extreme, and even, in my opinion, unhealthful…but I am particularly using the SCIENCE from their research and findings and studies, to customize and create a workable lifestyle of HEALTH for me.

So, that being said, are you READY for some info? Are you ready for some fun!?

Next post will be all about ME, and a streamlined list of my resources, including links to websites and books.

Leave some feedback, if you will, and let me know what you’re interested in!

The Medicine in my Fridge.

20 Feb

I love food.

This week has been a wonderfully medicinal time in the kitchen.

We ended up catching a cold this week.

It’s been interesting. Here’s the line up.

Daddy

Mommy ~ Me

Kameo ~ 14 year old

Donavon ~ 12 year old

Jonathan ~ 8 year old

Lynda ~ 9 months old

Lynda got ‘sick’ on Tuesday. Took her in to the clinic. Just a cold. Yay.

Friday, Donavon got sick. Sad face. So, chicken soup it was.

From one of the MANY books I got from the library, “Food ~ Your Miracle Medicine ~ How Food Can Prevent And Cure Over 100 Symptoms and Problems Based on More Than 10,000 Scientific Studies” By Jean Carper

Here’s an excerpt:

Page 338 Chicken Soup, Always Chicken Soup

Says Dr. Ziment, “Chicken, like most protein foods, contains a natural amino acid called cysteine, which is released when you make the soup. Cysteine bears a remarkable chemical similarity to a drug called acetylcysteine, which doctors prescribe for their patients with bronchitis and respiratory infections.” Indeed, acetylcysteine was originally derived from chicken feathers and skin, he notes. Pharmacologically, acetylcysteine, like other mucokinetics, thins down mucus in the lungs, making it easier to expel.

Marvin Sackner, M.D., a pulmonary specialist at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, agrees. “There’s an aromatic substance in chicken soup…that helps clear your airways.” Dr. Sackner is the author of the famous chicken soup study published in 1978 in the prestigious medical journal Chest. Skeptical that ‘Jewish penicillin’ fought cold symptoms any better than hot water, Dr. Sackner had fifteen healthy men and women sip hot chicken soup, hot water or cold water. Five minutes and thirty minutes later, he measured the rate at which mucus and air flowed through the subjects’ nasal passages.

To Dr. Sackner’s surprise, chicken soup was better at fighting congestion than hot or cold water. Further, even the chicken soup vapors  were superior to those of hot water. Dr. Sackner even thinks cold chicken soup “will help clear the ‘cold in your nose,’ and if the chicken soup is hot and steamy, it will clear it even faster and more efficiently.”

Page 345 OTHER FLU~FIGHTING FOODS

  • Ginger destroys influenza viruses.
  • A substance called lentinan in shiitake mushrooms fights the influenza viruses better than a prescription antiviral drug, according to Japanese tests.
  • Quercetin, concentrated in onions, has antiviral and antibacterial activity.

Dinner: Sauteed onions and shiitake mushrooms, with ginger juice and fresh garlic. Add, LARGE chunks of chicken breast. Simmer, and ENJOY! It was AMAZING! My kids were amazing. They don’t like mushrooms, but they LOVE that I LOVE taking care of them. They ALL ate them, without whining or complaining or making faces. (They were hardly noticeable, BTW…). Dear Daughter said all she had to do was swallow them. She liked the ginger and chicken. Yay! 🙂

We also made good smoothies this evening:

  • Spinach ~ The good: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Niacin and Zinc, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Copper and Manganese.
  • Kiwi ~ The good: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Potassium and Copper, and a very good source of Vitamin C and Vitamin K.
  • Parsley ~ The good: This food is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Pantothenic Acid, Phosphorus and Zinc, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Potassium, Copper and Manganese. (Also a very good aid for respiratory health.)
  • Pineapple ~ The good: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a very good source of Vitamin C and Manganese. (For Blood Type A it’s a HIGHLY BENEFICIAL as a digestive aid)
  • Cucumber ~ The good: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Thiamin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Pantothenic Acid, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Copper and Manganese, and a very good source of Vitamin C and Vitamin K.
  • Banana ~ (for the kids)  The good: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Potassium and Manganese, and a very good source of Vitamin B6.
  • Frozen Peach Slices (5) ~ (for me)  The good: This food is very low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium. It is also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Niacin and Potassium, and a very good source of Vitamin C. (Mine were unsweetened frozen…they don’t have a listing for unsweetened peaches)
It’s been a great week of medicinal cooking and loving on my family. 🙂 I am so blessed that my family LOVES that I take care of them, and nourish them. What a blessing.
What’s new in your kitchen? What’s going on with you?

Be blessed.

It’s not about ‘what I can’t eat’…it’s about being MINDFUL.

17 Feb

Hello, all.

So, it’s been a while.

I have been rather busy this last week. But there are some fun things I wanted to share.

Interesting may be a better term.

So…I have really been diggin’ eating more healthful food and eating for my blood type…but I’ve been trying to keep a ‘level head’ about it. Not thinking, “I can’t have THIS food, or I can’t have THAT food.” Instead, I’m really viewing food as “How can I best support my body and it’s functions?” and “Be MINDFUL about what goes in my mouth and WHY.”

So, the other night, I went out with friends for a girls night…Dinner and a Hockey game. YAY!

Well, the restaurant of choice was Indian food. Well, I couldn’t believe that pretty much EVERYTHING on the menu had AT LEAST ONE if not an ENTIRE selection of foods on my AVOID list…(Remember, AVOID for the Eat for Your Blood Type responds in our bodies as ‘poison’ for one reason or another, ie. doesn’t metabolize well, or stores as fat, or hard on my blood types digestive system, etc…)…so, I found ONE meal that was ‘ok’. Yay me. 🙂

While we were eating, I thought, ‘You know…this whole food thing isn’t about what I can’t have…just to have fun, I’ll try a bit of my friends’ meals, so I can say I tried them.’…”MINDFULNESS: Enjoy the food and company.” (Right?)

So, I did. I had a BITE or TWO (no more) of each of the other three’s dinners. Each one had a few things on my AVOID list…but what the heck, right?

I WAS SICK AS A DOG! I felt like I had the FLU! Oh my gosh. My heartburn returned. My tummy was upset. I was sweating like a crazy person. I felt FLUish! It wasn’t food poisoning…well, not ‘food poisoning’ but it was ‘poison food’ for my body. And since I’ve been really adhering to my list, I have felt amazing, and not had heartburn (which I’d suffered with for about 8 1/2 months since baby was born…EVERY DAY!). It was amazing.

Needless to say, I learn those lessons rather easily…I don’t enjoy feeling sick, when I CAN AVOID IT…that’s why I’ve only had two hangovers in my LIFE…! I am a wuss. I don’t LIKE to CHOOSE to feel like crap. 😉

I have really embraced eating veggies for the majority of my nourishment and love how I feel. I love knowing what does what to me and my body. And why.

What have you been up to? What healthful changes are you making? Or considering making?

Today my kiddlets are a little under the weather…so I am going to feed their ‘colds’ with amazing chicken soup…full of ginger, and garlic and chicken breast. Some delish veggies: carrots, celery, maybe some rice. 🙂 Brown rice. Just for fun and stuff. They will drink lemon water. Mmm mmm. And perhaps a smoothie. 🙂

Be blessed.

KarlaMarie